College of Graduate Studies

Jerry R. McMurtry, Interim Dean (104 Morrill Hall; 208/885-6243).

The College of Graduate Studies was formally organized in 1925 (then designated as the Graduate School) but the university has awarded advanced degrees since 1897. The College of Graduate Studies encompasses all graduate programs of the university but does not supervise programs in the College of Law. This coverage of all regular disciplines and professional fields provides a wide variety of academic programs. Enrollments are large enough to make possible the vital interchange of ideas among students and between students and faculty that is necessary for graduate programs and yet enrollments are sufficiently small to permit close faculty-student relationships. Interdepartmental cooperation is an important factor on the Idaho campuses. The University is the chief research center for the state and as such operates active graduate programs in most areas providing a broad research base upon which graduate programs have been built.

Graduate Council

The Graduate Council is the representative body of and is empowered to act for the Graduate Faculty. It is responsible to and reports to the Graduate Faculty, which retains the authority to review actions of the council. Its function is to promote graduate instruction and research, to formulate policies and long-range plans for the graduate programs, and to review and act on student appeals and petitions that involve exceptions to accepted regulations and procedures of the College of Graduate Studies.

The Graduate Council is constituted of one member elected by and from the constituent graduate faculty of each of the colleges that offer programs leading to graduate degrees (except the J.D. degree), four members of the Graduate Faculty appointed by the president of the university, two graduate students, the dean of the College of Graduate Studies, who serves as chair, and the assistant or associate dean of the College of Graduate Studies, who serves as vice chair.

Undergraduate Enrollment in the College of Graduate Studies

A senior (90 or more credits) who has a cumulative grade-point average of 3.00 or higher may register for courses at the 500-level. Graduate courses taken as an undergraduate student will automatically be recorded on the undergraduate transcript. Students desiring to have graduate level courses taken as an undergraduate placed on a graduate transcript must follow the policies on reserving courses for the graduate transcript. If the credit reservation form is approved, a separate graduate transcript will be created for the student. Capable students who are in their senior year can thus begin limited graduate work at an earlier date than would otherwise be possible. 

Reserving Undergraduate Courses for the Graduate Transcript

Students desiring to move courses from their undergraduate transcript to a graduate transcript may do so by filing the Credit Reservation Form with the College of Graduate Studies.   Courses from the undergraduate record may be moved to a graduate transcript if they meet the following criteria 1) the student has a cumulative GPA of 3.00 or greater; 2) the course is at the 400 level or higher; 3) the grade in the course is A or B; 4) the course was not used to meet the requirements for the undergraduate degree.  No more than 12 credits of undergraduate work can be moved to the graduate transcript under this policy.

Students are responsible to initiate the course reservation process as soon as they know they wish to move a course to the graduate level and prior to receiving their baccalaureate degree. No courses will be moved to the graduate transcript once the baccalaureate degree has been conferred. Undergraduate courses completed at another institution are not eligible to be reserved.  Courses will not be reserved until final grades for the term have been posted. Students who have courses placed on a graduate transcript and later wish to be admitted to the College of Graduate Studies for work toward an advanced degree must apply for admission to the College of Graduate Studies following the usual procedures. All courses placed on the graduate transcript, regardless of course level, will be assessed graduate fees.

General Graduate Regulations

The regulations described in this section are the minimum standards established by the faculty of the College of Graduate Studies. Graduate programs may establish additional regulations, including additional residence requirements, above the minimums set by the College of Graduate Studies.

Student Responsibilities. The student is responsible for complying with all rules, procedures, and time limits as established by the graduate faculty.

Appointment of Major Professor and Committee for All Degree Seeking Graduate Students. The major professor must be a member of the UI Graduate Faculty. All master's degree seeking graduate students are required to formally appoint a major professor by using the Appointment of Major Professor form within the first year following enrollment in the program. (For the M.F.A. program, within three semesters of registration, the student and the departmental administrator or graduate coordinator nominates the major professor.) For non-thesis master’s and specialist students are strongly encouraged to select or be assigned a major professor no later than the end of the first semester and it is required by the end of the first year. It is important to note that the Interdisciplinary Studies master's degree requires at least four members on a student's committee, whether the student is thesis or non-thesis. A committee will consist of at least one member from each of the two principal disciplines involved in the student's program, one from a supporting discipline, and one member recommended to or appointed by the College of Graduate Studies.

Doctoral students are required to select or be assigned a major professor no later than the end of the third semester in the program.

The committee, if required, is recommended by the major professor and the student and approved by the graduate program's administrator and the dean of the College of Graduate Studies. At least one-half of the members of the committee must be members of the UI Graduate Faculty. A faculty member may not serve on a committee for a student who is seeking a degree higher than the faculty member has attained. A graduate program's member who has an affiliate appointment to another program cannot be considered an outside committee member for a student in the faculty member’s primary program. (For the M.F.A. program, the committee consists at least of the major professor, a second faculty member from the major field and a member from a discipline outside the major department's discipline(s).)

Periodically, a qualified person with a particular expertise is requested to serve on a student’s committee on a one-time appointment. The person must have written approval from the dean of the College of Graduate Studies in advance of the individual’s committee participation. In this case, the person would not have to meet the rules of appointment and would be considered an outside member to the committee. Should the person be recommended for multiple committees, he/she would need to be approved as an adjunct faculty member and, therefore, would then be considered a member of the program recommending adjunct membership and would serve as an inside member on that program’s students' committees. It is the intent of the Graduate Council that this privilege be used sparingly and only when the situation indicates its necessity.

Removal of Faculty from a Committee. A faculty member can be removed as a major professor or a committee member if it is determined that continued membership is not in the best interest of the graduate program's or the student's. Such a request would be initiated by the student and advanced only if the remaining committee supports such request. The determination of action will be made through deliberation between the program’s dean and the dean of the College of Graduate Studies. This policy is not designed to question or remove a faculty’s inherent right to minority opinion regarding research or academic standards.

A faculty member who has separated from the university, other than those with emeriti status, must be replaced as the major professor or a committee member on all of his or her student committees.

Exceptions to the above policy must be approved in advance of committee participation and in writing by the dean of the College of Graduate Studies. Reasons for considering an exception could include, but are not limited to: the anticipated completion date of the student; if the student is better served without committee disruption; if the separated faculty member becomes adjunct faculty; or if there are intellectual property issues to be considered.

Qualifying Examination. If such an examination is required, it is conducted according to the program's procedures and is a prerequisite to the preparation of a study plan. A report of this examination is not submitted to the College of Graduate Studies.

Graduate Reviews for the M.F.A. Graduate reviews are conducted by department graduate faculty members. The initial graduate review is conducted in the first semester of registration and serves to assess the background of the student in both major and supporting fields and to provide in part the basis for the preparation of the student's study plan.  The remaining reviews are used to assess growth and the ability to complete the program.

Preparation and Submission of Study Plan. Early in the student's academic career, the student prepares in conference with the major professor (and committee, if required by department) a study plan outlining all course work to be completed to fulfill the requirements for the degree. Normally, the study plan will include some work to be taken outside of the major department. The study plan is submitted for the approval by the student's major professor, the program administrator, and the dean of the College of Graduate Studies. Any subsequent changes in the study plan must receive the same approvals.

All degree seeking graduate students must have a study plan on file with the College of Graduate Studies. Study plans cannot be processed without an assigned major professor. All masters and specialist degree seeking students are required to file a study plan with the College of Graduate Studies by the end of the first year of attendance. (For the M.F.A. program, students must prepare a study plan within two semesters of registration (or two summer sessions for those attending in the summer only.) Doctoral degree seeking students are required to file a study plan with the College of Graduate Studies by the end of the third semester in the program.

Research Approval. Prior to beginning any research projects, approval must be granted by one or more of the following groups, if it applies to the research that is being conducted: the Institutional Review Board (IRB) for research involving human subjects; the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) for research using vertebrate animals; the Institutional Biosafety Committee (IBC) for research using any biological agents or recombinant DNA; the Idaho Research Foundation for research that has the possibility of patent or license outputs; the University Research Office for research involving agents or federal controls on the development, use and distribution of technology; or the Office of Sponsored Programs for activities funded through external grants and contracts. Should the research methodology or source of funding change, the appropriate group must be notified.

Petitions. Students and major professors are advised that the right of petition exists to waive or modify some university regulations. University academic petitions (see Academic Appeals Process) request waiver or modification of university regulations. College of Graduate Studies petitions request waiver or modification of regulations in this section. Favorable action can be expected only when circumstances and the presentation clearly justify an exception. Precedents are not set by previous actions and may not form the basis of a petition; rather the situation concerning the student involved is given consideration on an individual basis. An appeal of the decision made by the College of Graduate Studies petitions committee can be requested through Graduate Council. Further appeals may be made to the Provost's Office.

Once a College of Graduate Studies petition is submitted, the Dean or Associate Dean may act on or, in certain cases, will appoint a committee to hear the petition. The committee will consist of current Graduate Council members, when possible. The committee will review materials specifically related to the petition from both the student and College of Graduate Studies. The student's presence is not required and additional information may be requested by the committee. The committee's recommendation of action is then forwarded to the Graduate Council for review. Graduate Council will decide to support or reject the committee's recommendation and render a decision on the petition. Graduate Council may request a hearing to review all of the information related to the petition. The final decision of the Graduate Council may be appealed to the Provost. (See Faculty Staff Handbook 2500)

A fee is charged for each petition submitted to the Academic Petitions Committee or College of Graduate Studies.

Registration and Enrollment Requirements. Graduate students engaged in ANY activity requiring faculty or staff time and consultation, or the use of any UI facilities must register for the number of credits appropriate to the degree of activity involved during the semester of activity. Such activity includes, but is not limited to: writing, defending, or submitting a thesis or dissertation; research; working on or completion of a non-thesis requirement; or taking a preliminary examination. A student who was appropriately registered during a previous term and did not complete all the requirements by the end of that term but does so before the official opening date of the new term, is awarded the degree at the end of the following term without further registration.

Annual Enrollment Policy. Annual enrollment is required for all degree seeking graduate students. Annual enrollment is defined as registering for at least one credit at the 500 or higher level every 12 months. Professional development courses do not satisfy the annual enrollment requirement.

If annual enrollment is not maintained and the absence has been five or fewer terms, a request for reenrollment in the program is required prior to any future registration by completing the Request for Reenrollment form available on the College of Graduate Studies website. The reenrollment decision is made at the program level with final approval through the College of Graduate Studies and should be requested well in advance of the requested semester of return.

If annual enrollment is not maintained and the absence has been for more than five terms, a request for readmission to the program is processed through the Graduate Admissions Office as well as reenrollment through the College of Graduate Studies. The readmission decision is made at the program level and forwarded to the Graduate Admissions Office. The reenrollment decision is made at the program level and forwarded to the College of Graduate Studies.

A student may request approval of a planned leave if the anticipated absence will be longer than one year but for no more than five terms. Approval must be given in advance of the time of absence by completing the Approval of Planned Leave form with signatures from the major professor, program administrator, and the dean of the College of Graduate Studies.

A reenrollment fee is charged each time a reenrollment application or readmission form is processed. Any appeals to this policy are to be made to the dean of the College of Graduate Studies.

Change of Program. A student is admitted for work in a specified program and may not change without approval of the new program's administrator. Such procedure is formalized by a Change of Curriculum form signed by the chair of the program the student is leaving and the chair of the program in which the student wishes to enroll. The form must be approved by the dean of the College of Graduate Studies before it is forwarded to the Registrar's Office.

Credit Requirements for Full Time Students. A student is considered full time academically when registered for 9 or more credits. See also specific credit guidelines under "Student Financial Aid Services."

Regular Semester or Summer Session. The credit limit for a graduate student is 16 credits per semester or summer session (excluding courses taken for audit). With approval from the Associate Dean and a Change of Registration form, a student may enroll in up to 22 credits in the fall and spring semesters and 18 credits in the summer session.

Correspondence Courses. Credits earned in University of Idaho correspondence courses are applied to a graduate program only with the prior written approval of the dean of the College of Graduate Studies. Subject to approval by the appropriate program's administrator, correspondence credits from other institutions that are accepted for graduate credit by that institution may be accepted toward degree requirements. Grades earned in correspondence courses are not calculated into the student's GPA.

Probation, Disqualification, and Reinstatement. Graduate students remain in good standing if the semester GPA and the cumulative GPA are 3.00 or higher. A graduate student is placed on academic probation after any semester or summer session in which a GPA of less than 3.00 is earned in courses placed on the graduate transcript, regardless of the student's cumulative GPA. Students on academic probation who attain a semester GPA of 3.00 or higher during the next or subsequent semester or summer session after being placed on probation, but whose cumulative GPA is still below a 3.00, will remain on academic probation until the cumulative GPA is a 3.00 or higher.

The student will be disqualified if a semester GPA of less than 3.00 (regardless of cumulative GPA) is earned on courses placed on the graduate transcript during the second, consecutive semester or summer session in which regular grades of A, B, C, D, or F are received.

If a graduate student who is on probation receives an Incomplete during a semester, the revert grade listed for the Incomplete will be used to calculate the GPA for that semester. If the calculated semester GPA is 3.00 or higher, the student will be allowed to register for a current or future semester. If the calculated semester GPA is less than a 3.00 GPA, the student will be disqualified and will not be allowed to register for current or future semesters or sessions. If the student has registered pending receipt of the revert grade, the student will be disenrolled. Once the work is completed and a final grade is given, the GPA will be automatically recalculated.

A graduate student may be reinstated after disqualification under the following conditions: the student may not enroll as a graduate student for at least one semester (fall or spring), must get the positive recommendation of his or her program's administrator, and must get College of Graduate Studies permission. Reinstatement is granted for a specific semester only. The student must receive at least a 3.00 GPA the first semester back in the College of Graduate Studies. If a student does not register for that semester, he or she must again seek College of Graduate Studies permission for reinstatement. A student will remain on probation as long as the cumulative GPA is below a 3.00.

Grade Requirements. In order to be eligible for graduation, a candidate for an advanced degree must have a cumulative GPA, based on all grades on his or her graduate transcript, of at least 3.00 (A = 4.00) and at least a 3.0 overall GPA across all courses listed on the approved study plan. The relevant GPA is calculated as stated in regulation E. Courses in which grades of D or F are received may not be counted toward the satisfaction of degree requirements; however, those grades are included in the GPA.

Deficiencies. Courses that are needed to provide background for the student's program may be taken for audit or under the pass/fail option, unless the program advises otherwise. See rules for the pass/fail option under regulation B-11. When deficiency courses are taken for regular credit the resulting grade will be included in the computation of the GPA.

Foreign Language. There is no College of Graduate Studies foreign language requirement for a graduate degree; however some programs require a language examination or special course work.

Catalog Issue. The pertinent requirements for graduate degrees are those contained in the most recent UI catalog issue that was in effect at the time of, or subsequent to, the candidate's admission into a specific graduate program as a degree seeking student. A catalog issue is valid for a maximum of seven years from its effective date. The effective date of a catalog issue is the first Monday following spring graduation.

Application for Advanced Degree. The Application for Advanced Degree is submitted electronically by the student to the College of Graduate Studies, via VandalWeb, according to the deadline outlined in the academic calendar. In order for a student to apply for an advanced degree, a study plan must be posted by the Registrar's Office. Graduation applications are term specific. To change a graduation semester the current application must be canceled and the student must reapply for a subsequent term by the deadline.

Non-thesis Requirement (Non-thesis Master’s and Specialist Degrees). This exit requirement (an examination, presentation, portfolio, recital, project, or any requirement other than a thesis) is completed by non-thesis master’s and specialist students after the completion of most or all of the degree requirements. The program establishes the format and time frame and reports the results of the non-thesis requirement to the College of Graduate Studies using the Non-Thesis Report form. The exit requirement, if failed, may with the program's approval be repeated once. The interval before the second attempt may not be less than three months or longer than one year. No more than 2 credits may be used for completing the exit requirement may be used toward the degree. If a student fails the exit requirement twice, or the program does not allow the student to repeat the exit requirement after the first failure, or the student does not retake the exit requirement within a year, the student is automatically moved to unclassified enrollment status and is no longer in the degree program.

Final Defense (Master's thesis, Ph.D., Ed.D ., and D.A.T. Degrees). The final defense must be completed three weeks prior to the last day of the term in which the student plans to graduate. Before the final defense, the "Request to Proceed with Final Defense" form (see www.uidaho.edu/cogs/forms) must be submitted to the College of Graduate Studies. Ph.D., Ed.D., and D.A.T. students are required to submit the form at least 10 working days prior to the defense. Thesis students must have the form submitted at least one day prior to the defense. The defense is usually oral but part may be written. The candidate is required to defend his or her work and show a satisfactory knowledge of the program and supporting fields. A majority vote of the committee is necessary for a candidate to pass this defense. The defense, if failed, may with the programs approval be repeated once. The interval before the second attempt may not be less than three months or longer than one year.

Following a successful defense of his or her thesis, the candidate must submit the final electronic version into ETD/Proquest and the final signed bond paper copy to the College of Graduate Studies within six months; otherwise, the candidate must defend the thesis again and may be required to revise it or write an entirely new one. If a student fails the final defense twice, or the program does not allow the student to repeat the defense after the first failure, or the student does not repeat the defense within a year, the student is automatically moved to unclassified enrollment status and is no longer in the degree program.

Theses and Dissertations. The "Graduate Handbook for Preparing Theses and Dissertations," which outlines the procedures to follow and required format of the document can be obtained through the College of Graduate Studies website (www.uidaho.edu/cogs). All theses and dissertations are to be submitted through the Electronic Thesis and Dissertation web portal (www.uidaho.edu/etd) for initial format review through final submission. All thesis and dissertations must be uploaded into the ETD system in final form with all approvals, except the COGS dean, two weeks before the last day of the term in which the student plans to graduate. One additional full copy on bond paper is required by the UI Library and should be delivered to the College of Graduate Studies one week prior to the end of the term.

Satisfactory Academic Progress and Performance. Enrollment in the College of Graduate Studies allows students to continue graduate study and research through the University of Idaho only as long as they maintain satisfactory academic standing and are maintaining satisfactory progress and performance toward completion of their graduate degree program. See section L: L – Academic Standing, Probation, Disqualification, and Reinstatement

Satisfactory academic standing is defined under the rules of probation and disqualification and provisional admission and may or may not have an effect on the use of this policy.

Programs are encouraged to have a written policy distributed to all students that states the standards for satisfactory progress and performance. Examples of the program's requirements that may be used to measure progress or performance toward the degree are, but not limited to, the timely completion of: required course work, filing of appropriate paperwork, failure to complete the annual review process, the program's qualifying, preliminary or other examinations; attendance at seminars or other professional activities; or using acceptable safety or security standards in performance of duties.

Annual Review. The annual review process is initiated by the student and completed by the major professor using the Annual Evaluation and Performance Report http://www.uidaho.edu/cogs/forms provided by the College of Graduate Studies. If a major professor has not been appointed, the program's administrator will conduct the review. When completed, the reviewer will recommend that the student continue in the program, receive a warning, or be dismissed from the program.

  • Warning. Should a warning be given, the student must be informed in writing of the concern, the current program policy, the length of the warning period, and expectations that must be met to be removed from a warning status. The Associate Dean of the College of Graduate Studies is notified of this action. An appeal of a recommendation for a warning may be made to the Dean of the College of Graduate Studies.
  • Dismissal. If Dismissal is recommended it may or may not be preceded by a warning period. If dismissal is recommended, the program's administrator forwards the recommendation and documentation to the Associate Dean of the College of Graduate Studies. The Dean of the College of Graduate Studies will review the recommendation for dismissal and, if appropriate, will convene a committee of graduate faculty to review the dismissal recommendation. The student, the major professor, and the program's administrator will be allowed to appear before the committee. The committee will make a recommendation for action to the Dean of the College of Graduate Studies who will make the final decision. Dismissal is from the student’s degree, program and from the College of Graduate Studies.
  • Appeals. Students may appeal the Dean’s decision directly to the Graduate Council. No action will appear on the transcript unless recommended by Graduate Council.

General Requirements for Master's Degrees

Credits. All master's degree programs require a minimum of 30 credits. Some master's degree programs may require more. Additional work may be stipulated in individual cases to meet particular objectives or need for additional background. Courses used toward an undergraduate degree, professional development courses or courses on a professional development transcript are not available to be used toward a graduate degree.

No more than three credits of workshop or workshop equivalent courses may be used toward the graduate degree.

Credit in course 500 (Master's Research and Thesis) cannot be counted toward a non-thesis master's degree. Although no limit is imposed on the number of credits that may be earned in course 500 for degrees with thesis, only a maximum of 10 credits in course 500 in the major of the degree can be used to fulfill master's degree requirements (a lower limit may be set by the program). Up to five credits of course 599 (Non-thesis Research) are allowed to count towards a non-thesis master's degree; however, if a thesis option exists for the program, no more credits of course 599 are allowed toward the non-thesis master's degree than half the number of credits allowed for course 500 toward the program's master's degree.

Transfer, Correspondence Study, Non-degree Credit, and Over-aged Credit Limitation. The combined total of transfer credits, correspondence credits, non-degree credits, credits moved from an undergraduate transcript that were not used toward an undergraduate degree, and approved credits more than eight years old at the time the degree is awarded shall not exceed 12 credits for master's programs designated as requiring 36 or fewer credits, and shall not exceed one-third of the total credits in designated programs requiring more than 36 credits. The student's program may set a lower limitation. Credits can be transferred to UI, with the consent of the student's committee and the dean of the College of Graduate Studies, only if the institution from which the course credits are being transferred has a graduate program in the course's discipline or, should there be no graduate program in the course's discipline, if an exception has been granted by the Dean of the College of Graduate Studies. All credits used toward graduate degrees must be from regionally accredited American institutions or from non-US institutions recognized by the appropriate authorities in their respective countries. Transfer credits are subject to all other Graduate College rules and regulations. See additional information on accreditation: www.uidaho.edu/registrar/transfer/evaluation/accreditation.

Second Master's Degrees. A student who has a master's degree or is working on a master's degree may obtain a second master's degree only in a different major, subject to the approval of the dean of the College of Graduate Studies. Up to six credits of course work used to satisfy the requirements for the first degree may be applied to the second; all other catalog requirements and credit requirements in UI courses must be fulfilled. If the courses are transfer courses, they are counted as a part of the credits that are allowed for transfer, correspondence, non-degree, over-aged credits and credits moved from an undergraduate transcript.

With department approval, a student in the M.F.A. Theater Arts program may use up to 30 credits from a M.A. Theater Arts program toward the M.F.A. A student who is enrolled in a doctoral program or who has a doctorate may obtain a master's degree in a different field and use up to 6 common credits or more if approved by Graduate Council. A student who has a doctorate may not subsequently obtain a master's degree in the same field.

Concurrent Graduate/Law Degrees. UI law courses used toward an approved UI concurrent graduate degree must be approved by the College of Graduate Studies and included on the graduate student’s approved study plan. Courses with grades and credits earned in these approved law courses will be posted to the student’s graduate academic transcript as a pass (P) upon receipt of the Course Level Adjustment form in the UI Registrar’s Office. See the Accounting, Environmental Science and Water Resources sections in the individual department section for additional information on concurrent degrees.

Awarding M.F.A. Degrees to Members of the Faculty. A UI faculty member with rank of senior instructor or above may not be awarded an M.F.A. degree through the department or corresponding program in which he or she is employed, unless that faculty member had been admitted to that degree program before attaining such academic rank.

Specific Requirements for Master's Degrees

Master of Accountancy. The M.Acct. degree is 30 credits. At least 18 must be in courses at the 500 level and the remainder may include one 400 level course in the major and 300 and 400 level courses in supporting areas, to be approved by the major professor. A non-thesis requirement must be met. Students enrolled in the concurrent M.Acct./J.D. may use 15 credits of law courses toward the M.Acct. degree only if the law degree is completed.

Master of Architecture. The M.Arch. degree requires a design project. Refer to the Art and Architecture section of this catalog for a definition of specific admission and degree requirements. Of the minimum 45 credits required for the degree, 24 must be at the 500 level; the remainder may include 400 level courses in the major and 300 or 400 level courses in supporting areas. All credits toward the degree must be earned in residence at UI or during internship and study abroad. A final design project must be accepted.

Master of Arts. In some fields, all candidates for the M.A. degree are required to present a thesis; in others the thesis is optional or not required. Consult the departmental section for specific descriptions. Of the minimum 30 credits required for the degree, at least 18 credits must be at the 500 level; the remainder may include 400 level courses in the major and 300 or 400 level courses in supporting areas. For the thesis student, a thesis is required. For the non-thesis student, a non-thesis requirement must be met.

Master of Arts in Teaching. The M.A.T. is primarily for certified teachers who wish to strengthen their subject-matter preparation. Enrollment in this program of study requires the consent of the chair of the subject-matter department. The major professor is from the subject-matter department; the co-advisor is from the College of Education. The general requirements of the College of Graduation Studies apply except that, of the minimum 30 credits required, only six must be in courses at the 500 level, at least six must be in courses offered by the College of Education at the 400/500 level, excluding workshops, and at least 20 must be in courses in the subject field. These courses may be at the 300 or 400 level, including 300 level courses in the major field if they are a part of the logical sequence of study. A non-thesis requirement in the subject field must be met.

Master of Business Administration. The M.B.A. is a professional fee program that is delivered in an executive format in northern Idaho. This non-thesis program consists of 42 credits at the 500 level. Consult the College of Business for specific details.

Master of Education. To complete the M.Ed., a non-thesis degree program, the student must fulfill the program’s non-thesis requirement. Of the minimum 30 credits required, at least 18 must be in courses at the 500 level; the remainder may include 400 level courses in the major and 300 or 400 level courses in supporting areas.

Master of Engineering. The M.Engr. is a non-thesis degree. A minimum of 30 credits is required; at least 18 must be in courses at the 500 level and the remainder may include 400 level courses in the major and 300 or 400 level courses in supporting areas. A non-thesis requirement must be met. Majors are offered in agricultural, chemical, civil, computer, electrical, mechanical, and (at the University of Idaho Center, Idaho Falls only) nuclear engineering. The prospective student should consult the specific department for special entrance requirements.

Master of Fine Arts. The M.F.A. is the professionally recognized terminal degree in fine arts including art, creative writing, and theatre arts. See the specific department for credit requirements.

Master of Music. The M.Mus. degree, depending on the concentration selected, requires a thesis, public graduate recitals, or a final project. No credit is granted for the final project in a non-thesis degree plan and the project is subject to approval of the supervisory committee. Both written and oral non-thesis requirements must be met in all degree options. Of the minimum 30 credits required for the degree, at least 18 must be in courses in the School of Music at the 500 level; the remainder may include 400 level courses in the School of Music and 300 or 400 level courses in other areas.

Master of Natural Resources. The M.N.R. program provides broad-based, advanced training in natural resource management and administration. The M.N.R. degree requires 30 semester credits beyond the bachelor's degree. Only courses at the 400 or 500 level counts toward the degree. At least 18 of the 30 credits must be at the 500 level. A comprehensive non-thesis requirement must be met.

Master of Public Administration. The M.P.A. program includes thesis and non-thesis options. Of the minimum 30 credits required for the degree, at least 18 must be in courses selected from prescribed core areas and 12 in designated optional areas of emphasis as described in the Department of Political Science section of this catalog; at least 18 of the 30 credits must be in courses at the 500 level. A public service internship is required of students with no appropriate work experience. For the thesis student, a thesis is required. For the non-thesis student, a non-thesis requirement must be met.

Master of Science. In some fields, all candidates for the M.S. degree are required to present a thesis; in others the thesis is optional or not required. Consult the departmental section for specific descriptions. Of the minimum 30 credits required for the degree, at least 18 credits must be at the 500 level; the remainder may include 400 level courses in the major, and 300 or 400 level courses in supporting areas. For the thesis student, a thesis is required. For the non-thesis student, a non-thesis requirement must be met.

Master of Science in Athletic Training.  The M.S.A.T. is a non-thesis degree with a minimum of 88 credits at the 500-level required.  Students may be admitted to the program through two methods: either by admission after completion of a bachelor’s degree from a regionally accredited institution or by early admission after the completion of the junior year in the UI Athletic Training track in Exercise Science and Health (B.S.P.E.) or by completion of the junior year in an approved program at an institution with an articulated agreement with UI.  Students offered early admission to the graduate program must meet all admissions and prerequisite course work requirements for the Master of Science in Athletic Training degree, as well as all undergraduate requirements excluding the first 30 credits of the graduate program.  Upon successful completion of the first 30 graduate credits, students may use these credits in transfer towards their undergraduate degree requirements.  There is a professional fee for the M.S.A.T. program; consult the program coordinator for details.

Professional Science Master. Contact the Director of the Program in Environmental Science for information regarding this degree. Of the minimum 35 credits required for the degree, at least 26 credits must be at the 500 level; the remainder may include 400 level courses. This is a non-thesis program.

Education Specialist Degrees

The University of Idaho awards the degree of Education Specialist to students who want an organized program of graduate studies beyond the master's degree but who may not wish to pursue a doctoral program. The Education Specialist degree is delivered only by the College of Education.

Requirements for Education Specialist Degree

Credit Requirements. An acceptable program of at least 60 upper-division and graduate level semester credits beyond the bachelor's degree is required. Additional credits may be required for those who have master's degrees in other areas of emphasis or who have deficiencies. Credits listed on an undergraduate transcript, professional development courses, or courses on a professional degree transcript are not available to be used toward a specialist degree. No more than three credits of workshop or workshop-related courses may be used toward a specialist degree. Thesis or dissertation credits cannot be used towards a specialist degree. Each student, following advising, will submit the study plan for approval to the major professor, the appropriate program administrator, and the dean of the College of Graduate Studies for approval.

Transfer, Correspondence Study, and Non-degree Credit Limitation. No more than 12 of the last 30 credits may be taken as transfer courses, correspondence courses (with prior written approval of the dean of the College of Graduate Studies), or non-degree courses. Transfer credits must be from institutions offering graduate programs in the discipline(s) of the course(s) being transferred. All credits used toward graduate degrees must be from regionally accredited American institutions or from non-US institutions recognized by the appropriate authorities in their respective countries.

Time Limit. The last 30 credits must have been taken in the eight years preceding the semester in which the degree is awarded.

Procedures for Education Specialist Degree

See the General Graduate Regulations section regarding appointment of major professor, study plans, application for advanced degree, final semester registration, and non-thesis requirement.

Doctoral Degrees

The University of Idaho awards the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in recognition of high achievement in scholarly and research activity. The degree of Doctor of Education is granted for high scholarly attainment and in recognition of the completion of academic preparation for professional practice. See Procedures for Doctor of Philosophy and Doctor of Education Degrees for more details. The Doctor of Athletic Training is offered through the College of Education and the Department of Movement Sciences. See Procedures and Requirements Specific to the Doctor of Athletic Training for more details.

The major professor and program offering a particular doctoral program indicate the general philosophy of the degree program, the objectives of courses and seminars, the research specialties available, and requirements unique to the department. Admission to the doctoral program is granted only to those who have a recognized potential for completing the degree.

Requirements for Doctoral Degrees

Credit Requirements. For the Ph.D. and Ed.D., a minimum of 78 credits beyond the bachelor's degree is required; of these, at least 52 credits must be at the 500 level or above and at least 33 of the 78 credits must be in courses other than 600 (Doctoral Research and Dissertation). A maximum of 45 credits in dissertation and 5 credits of 599 (Non-thesis Research) may be used toward the degree. For the D.A.T., a minimum of 66 credits are required (including all dissertation work). Courses numbered below 300 may not be used to fulfill the requirements for a doctoral degree; courses numbered 300-399 may be used only in supporting areas. Individual programs may require additional course work. Applicants having a doctoral degree may obtain a second doctoral degree subject to the approval of the Graduate Council. The Graduate Council will establish the requirements for the second degree.

Credit Limitations for Transfer, Correspondence Study, and Non-degree. For the Ph.D. and Ed.D. degrees, a student must complete at least 39 of the 78 required credits at UI while matriculated in the College of Graduate Studies. Credits can be transferred to UI, with the consent of the student's major professor, the committee (if required by the program), the program's administrator, and the dean of the College of Graduate Studies. Credits can be transferred only if the institution from which the credits are being transferred has a graduate program in the course's discipline. All credits used toward graduate degrees must be from regionally accredited American institutions or from non-US institutions recognized by the appropriate authorities in their respective countries. Transfer credits are subject to all other College of Graduate Studies rules and regulations. Correspondence study courses may be applied to the degree only with the prior written approval of the College of Graduate Studies. Courses used toward an undergraduate degree, professional development courses, and courses on a professional development transcript are not available to be used toward a doctoral degree.

Time Limits. Of the credits submitted to satisfy the requirements for a Ph.D. or Ed.D. degree, a maximum of 30 may be more than eight years old when the degree is conferred, provided the student's committee and program administrator determine that the student has kept current in the subjects concerned. Graduation must occur no later than five years after the date on which the candidate passed his or her preliminary or general examination. These time limitations can be extended only on recommendation of the committee and approval by the Graduate Council.

Awarding Doctoral Degrees to Members of the Faculty. Regulations are outlined in Section 4920 of the Faculty-Staff Handbook.

Particular Requirements for the Ed.D . Degree. A period of professional practice is required for the Doctor of Education degree; the period involved is determined by the student's supervisory committee. While the Ed.D. is a College of Education degree, you should consult with the departments in the College of Education to learn of specific emphasis requirements.

Procedures for Doctor of Philosophy and Doctor of Education Degrees

Appointment of Major Professor and Committee. Refer to the "Appointment of Major Professor and Committee for All Degree Seeking Graduate Students" in the preceding General Graduate Regulations section. In addition, a supervisory committee consists at least of four people: the major professor as chair and a second UI faculty member both from the major's program, one faculty member from a minor or supporting area, and a faculty member from a discipline outside the major.

Qualifying Examination. The qualifying examination is a program option and serves to assess the background of the student in both the major and supporting fields and to provide partially the basis for preparation of the student's study program. A particular program may or may not require a master's degree as a prerequisite for the qualifying evaluation. As soon as the program's qualifications are met, a supervisory committee is appointed.

Preparation of Study Plan. Refer to the "Preparation and Submission of Study Plan" in the preceding General Graduate Regulations section.

Preliminary Examination for Ph.D. Degree. The preliminary examination should be scheduled only after the student has completed the majority of the courses on his or her study plan. The student is required to be registered during the semester the preliminary examination is taken. The student's committee certifies to the College of Graduate Studies the results of the preliminary examination and if passed, the student is advanced to candidacy. Graduation must occur no later than five years after the date on which the candidate passed his or her examination. If the preliminary examination is failed, it may be repeated only once; the repeat examination must be taken within a period of not less than three months or more than one year following the first attempt. If a student fails the preliminary examination a second time, or the program does not allow the student to repeat the examination after the first failure or the student does not retake the examination within one year, the student is automatically moved to unclassified enrollment status and is no longer in the degree program.

General Examination for Ed.D . Degree. When the student approaches the end of his or her course work, has completed the professional experience requirement and has outlined the dissertation subject in detail, the supervisory committee approves the holding of the general examination. The student is required to be registered during the semester the general examination is taken. The examination is both written and oral and is intended to assess progress toward degree objectives. The student's committee certifies to the College of Graduate Studies the results of the general examination and if passed, the student is advanced to candidacy. Graduation must occur no later than five years after the date on which the candidate passed his or her examination. If the general examination is failed, it may be repeated only once; the repeat examination must be taken within a period of not less than three months or more than one year following the first attempt. If a student fails the general examination a second time, or the program does not allow the student to repeat the examination after the first failure or the student does not retake the examination within one year, the student is automatically moved to unclassified status and is no longer in the degree program.

See the General Graduate Regulations section regarding application for advanced degree, registration requirements, final defense and dissertation requirements.

Procedures for Doctor of Athletic Training

The Culminating Clinical Project. Students enrolled in the Doctor of Athletic Training (D.A.T.) will engage in research projects during the curricular phase of the program. These project(s) will lead to at least two publication ready manuscripts and all students must meet professional authorship requirements (regardless of order). See Department of Movement Sciences and Doctor of Athletic Training webpages for more information.

The Team (Committee). All D.A.T. project team committees will have at least four committee members: two members of the athletic training faculty (all with graduate faculty status), the student's Attending Clinician (who is the student's on-site mentor during the student's residency), and an expert in the student's chosen area of clinical research. The AT faculty members will always chair the CCP, provide research guidance, and serve as the experts in the development of advanced practice in Athletic Training. A situation may arise in which one or both of the members of the committee that are outside of the AT program faculty may have a degree less than that of which the student is seeking, however, the intent of the third and fourth D.A.T. committee membership is to provide outside validation of the student's progress toward advanced practice and clinical utility of action research studies.

Culminating Clinical Project Hours. These dissertation hours may be used in instances when the CCP has not been successfully completed and the curricular phase of program has been completed.

Assistantships and Research Fellowships

Assistantships are open to domestic and international students who are regularly enrolled students in the College of Graduate Studies.

Students in the provisional enrollment category or in the unclassified enrollment category are NOT eligible to receive assistantships.

An inquiry for a position or award should be addressed to the administrator of the graduate program in which the applicant plans to enroll for graduate study. Appointments include a work requirement of up to 20 clock hours per week. Assistants are considered students. Assistants who provide primary teaching responsibilities, grading assignments, assisting with the delivery of instruction through technology, and providing other assistance related to instruction under the active supervision of a member of the university faculty are teaching assistants. Assistants who provide support of research, scholarship, or creative activity are research assistants. (See FSH 1565 H-2 for full definitions.) Those appointed to assistantships supported by the university are advised that the appointments are tenable only in the program of the major field of study, except where prior written exceptions are made. Annual leave, sick leave, and health insurance benefits are not available for graduate assistants.

Continuation of any assistantship after the first semester is contingent upon satisfactory academic performance, satisfactory teaching and/or laboratory performance, progress toward your degree, and abiding by the program and University’s policies and procedures. UI policies are available online in the Faculty-Staff Handbook.

Assistants are required to sign a Terms of Employment form and a Patent and Copyright Agreement for University of Idaho Employees. All assistants are required to have personal health insurance coverage or enrollment in the Student Health Insurance Program. Salaries for assistantships vary depending upon the graduate program, length of graduate service and whether they are for an academic year or for 12 months. Contact program for current salary levels.

All new teaching and/or research assistants are required to attend the TA/RA Institute prior to the beginning of the semester in which they are first offered an assistantship. New TA/RA's are also required to complete a course through BbLearn. All new international TA's are required to register for INTR 508.

In addition, nonresident tuition will be waived for persons holding full appointments and a pro rata portion of nonresident tuition will be waived for persons holding partial appointments. However, each person who holds a full appointment as an assistant is required to pay the uniform student fees and tuition charged to registered full time students, regardless of the number of credits for which the student is registered. Persons accepting part-time assistantships will be required to pay the uniform student fees and tuition based on the number of credit hours for which the person is registered.

Students on an assistantship cannot use a staff or staff spouse fee waiver or senior scholar waiver.

Research fellowships are awarded by various colleges. Research conducted on fellowships may or may not be used for dissertation purposes. Credit enrollment and stipends vary according to the particular fellowship. Fees and tuition are charged, but in some cases may be remitted, depending on the type of fellowship and the availability of funds. Inquiries should be addressed to the program administrator in which the applicant plans to enroll.